Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Yondu Recipe #1 Sesame Soba Noodles

OK let's turn this #WFPB

Here is the original recipe on the Yondu site:

Sesame Soba Noodles

Now create a #WFPB equivalent - in my experience about the same prep time, some 25-30 mins - I have adjusted it for a dinner for one:

  • 1 bunch soba noodles, cooked (typically 6-7 mins)

Veggies

  • 2 medium onions cut-up fine, or shredded on a mandoline
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 good sized crown of broccoli, cut into florets and stems sliced.
  • 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 TBSP Yondo
  • 1- 1.5 cups of water

Dressing

  • 2 Tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp Dijion mustard
  • 1 Tsp Yondu
  • 2 tsp grated ginger
  • 1 Tbsp roasted sesame seeds
  • 2 Tbsp grated ginger
  • 1-1.5 Tsp of date sugar

Prepping, Serving

  • cut up the onions and dry roast 5 mins at 425F (medium high)
  • mince the garlic, and add after 5 mins
  • stir fry for 5 mins at 425F while adding a few table spoons of the water with Yondu as needed to liquify
  • on this bed of onions and garlic pour a cup of water with 1 Tbsp Yondu and add the broccoli and scallion chunks.
  • simmer at low temp until the broccoli is done, some 20-30 mins.
  • add in the cooked soba noodles at the end.
  • Mix the dressing in a blender and poor it over the pasta
  • sprinkle on the sesame seeds, and any other garnish you might like, e.g. sliced peppers, hot or mild as you prefer, or hot pepper flakes, etc.
 Just enjoy it. This dish and a good size salad could make a meal. Easy.




 

Monday, June 10, 2019

I discovered Yondu at the Plant-based World Expo & Conference

Here is the Yondu website explaining what Yondu is.

Clearly, it is of Korean extraction, and it's a fermented brew from soybeans and veggie broth, but it is fermented in its own juices, with very little salt, which is the problem with some fermented projects like kimchi or Tianjin preserved vegetables. It seems expensive, but it's actually economical for you can use it just one teaspoon at a time.





It is amazing, you can cook without salt, and this chef does not yet know how to cook without oil, but you can absolutely make any veggie dish without oil.

Here was my first delicious recipe with some Organic Swiss Chard from ShopRite on the Bruckner:

A side of Swiss Chard with Yondu 

Ingredients

  • One bunch of Swiss chard
  • some fresh turmeric, minced, or turmeric powder
  • three small or two medium onions, cut up fine.
  • 3-5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 tsp of Yondu

 Preparation

  • Caramelized some onions, 5 mins dry roasting at 425F(Medium/high)
  • followed by gradually adding some minced garlic and fresh turmeric (always available at Al Aqsa on my street) and stir-frying for another 5 mins at 425F with some splashes of veggie broth.
  • Cut up the stems of the chard in 1/4" pieces, and added on top of the caramelized onions, while adding 1 cup of water with one tsp of Yondu.
  • Cooked for 10 mins at 275 F (Medium). 
  • Cut up the leaves in 1"strips, and put them on top of the onions and stems, and cooked for another 10 mins at 275F.
The result: a quick and easy side of veggies.

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

An Ayurvedic Okra Dal

Here is one more Okra recipe - by now I've made 4 different Okra dishes in the last few days, all because I bought a half a bushed of Okra for $3.99, and I ate some of what I made, but I froze a lot. That all goes into the idea of cooking cycles, now I have a ton of these Okra dishes, and it will make my cooking easier for months. You could just have some brown rice with a portion of this Okra Dal, some other vegetable, like spinach or zucchini or broccoli, or whatever, and a salad, and you have a meal fit for a prince.

Okra Dal (Ayurveda)

Get rid of the oil - all Ayurvedic recipes use oil, so that is the first thing to get rid of, and I tend to make up for the taste with some more onions and garlic.

Ingredients

2-3 onions, sliced
2-3 garlic cloves, minced.
1 teaspoon cumin seed
1 teaspoon of caraway (optional)
2 cinnamon sticks, broken up, or you can use some flat cinnamon and crush it with a mortar and pestle.
12-16  ounces red lentils
1 teaspoon ground coriander and/or
1/2 bunch of fresh cilantro chopped fine
1⁄2 teaspoon chili powder (or more, to taste)
1⁄4 teaspoon ground turmeric
4 1⁄2 cups water
1 large tomato, halved
24 okra (ca. 1 lb), topped and tailed, and cut in 1/2" sections
liquid aminos to taste
 

Preparation

  • Caramelize the onions in a large saucepan and cook with the cumin seeds and cinnamon over a medium heat for 5-10 minutes, until the onion is beginning to brown.
  • Add the lentils, coriander, chili powder and turmeric. Cook for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Add the water and then add the tomato and okra.
  • Bring to the boil, then cover and simmer for 25 minutes, until the okra and lentils are tender, stirring occasionally.

Sunday, May 12, 2019

Okra Tomato Stew

OK, so the other day I scored a 1/2 bushel of Okra for $3.99 and this has me cooking ahead.

There are tons of recipes and youtube videos around, and converting them to a #WFPB alternative is easy.

Basic Okra Recipe


Here is one nice video, which you can easily convert to #WFPBNO (No Oil - EVER!)

 
How to cook Okra and make an UNhealthy vegan dish

This recipe would be easy to make, and substitute the oil as follows:
  • Cut up the onion. Don't drag your knife sideways across the cutting board as the video shows - you will be destroying the edge of your knife very quickly.
  • Dry roast it for 5 minutes at 425F (medium/high) without stirring.
  • Stir fry it for another 5 minutes at 425F, while adding 2-3 icecubes of veggie broth
  • Follow the rest of the recipe.
 Ok, I have so much Okra, I am making this dish as well.

Her ingredients, with comments:

Okra/Lediesfinger- 500gm Onion- 1 medium or large - double up - see below.
add some chilis
Garlic- 3 or 4 cloves Turmeric powder- 1 tsp Cumin powder- 1tsp Salt- 1/2 tsp - use some liquid aminos instead Oil- 30ml - double up on the onions instead

I remove the oil and double up on the onions. That's all. 
-------------------------

So here's the main dish - the promised Okra Tomato Stew:

Okra Tomato Stew


Okra Tomato Stew #WFPB variant
 

Ingredients

  • 1 Bag of frozen okra (14 ounces) or the fresh okras
  •  1 red onion, chopped or a small bag of pearl onions (6 ounces)
  •  Tomato sauce (14 ounces) or fresh tomatoes, peeled and cut (diced)
  • some cilantro - I use about 10+ sprigs of cilantro and cut them up good
  • 1 teaspoon of allspice or seven-spice mix, or panchpuran
  • 1 Tablespoon of mashed garlic (mash with a teaspoon of salt till pasty), alternatively some garlic/ginger paste
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
 

Preparation

  • Chop the onion and dry roast it in a sauce pan, for 5 mins at 425F, while mincing the garlic.
  • Add the minced garlic and stir fry for 5 more mins at 425F, while adding 2-3 icecubes of veggie broth
  • Add the okra (still frozen) to the onions and stir-fry for 5 minutes or so.
  • Add the garlic paste to the okra, then the tomatoes (or tomato sauce) and lemon juice and allspice or panchpuran.
  • Cover the saucepan and let the mixture simmer for 45 minutes, making sure it does not burn at the bottom.
  • Add the cilantro if you're using it
  • Uncover the last five minutes of cooking to let more liquid evaporate and turn off the heat.
  • Serve at room temperature with some pita bread.
NOTE: To save time I use the frozen okra that is available at the Middle-Eastern store imported from Egypt; it is already prepped and requires no additional chopping. If you are using fresh okra, cut off the tip of the pod, dry with paper towels and stir-fry in olive oil; then proceed with the recipe.
The original recipe omits the cilantro, but I think it is delicious and really makes this stew a winner!!!

In an earlier post I discussed Okra in Lentil Sauce:
https://starlingaveplantbased.blogspot.com/2017/08/and-another-brilliant-wfpb-supper-at.html



Have at it folks.

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Baby Potatoes with Purslane Salad

[Contributed by Megan Saynisch, from the Real Food Right Now series
This is a delicious simple recipe. You can routinely get Purslane (Verdolaga) at the Mexican store Frutas Y Vegetales La Reyna at 1300-1302 Beach Avenue/corner Westchester Ave (opposite The South of France Restaurant.

Look at this nutrition information:
https://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/Verdolagas_Mexican_Parsley_9494.php

quote

Nutritional Value


Verdolagas is rich in potassium and magnesium and contains as much beta carotene as spinach. It also contains the omega three fatty acid known as alpha linolenic acid, which studies have shown can be helpful in lowering blood pressure and regulating cholesterol levels. Recent studies have also shown that Verdolagas contains a significant amount of melatonin as well.

unquote

Ingredients

1 lb fingerling potatoes, or young potatoes.
1 cup purslane leaves

3/2/1 dressing with one lemon or lime (3tbsp balsamic, 2 tbsp dijon mustard, 1 tbsp maple syrup)

red onion cut up fine

either 1/2 teaspoon of piment d'espelette (alternatively, 1 heaping teaspoon of paprika powder and  1/4 tsp of cayenne pepper)

1-2 tsp of dill

salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

  • boil the potatoes cut in small chunks
  • pluck the leaves off the purslane and reserve the stems for another use ( like making your own veggie broth or soup)
  • make the salad dressing
  • mix

Sunday, April 14, 2019

Collard Greens Galore

This is the report from the April 13th St. Helena's Communal #WFPB/Suppers Meal Prep event. We had five people.

We had a small group, and the program was a bit too much given the limited number of hands, but we had fun.


I had decided the theme for this time was collard greens, just to explore some different ideas. The salad was just an ordinary salad, but we split some ingredients with the stuffed collard greens later-on.

Salad:

Red leaf lettuce, baby spinach, beets and the works.

  • 3 beets boiled, peeled, grated (with the mandolin)
  • 1 head of red leaf lettuce
  • 1 box of baby spinach
  • a chopped white onion
  • 1/2 buch of enoki mushrooms
  • 2-3 cloves of minced garlic
  • a yellow, orange, and red pepper cut-up in small chunks
  • 5 tomatoes cut up fine
  • 1/2 bunch of parsley - leaves cut up fine.
  • several serving spoons of boiled quinoa
  • chia seeds
1/2/3 dressing with lemon: 1 tbsp maple syrup, 2 tbsp dijon mustard, 3 tbsp balsamic, plus the juice of one lemon and two limes. (It all depends on how much juice you get).

That was one mean salad!

Soup:

Based on the recipe for Loaded Miso Noodle Soup from NutritionStudies, but with some additions - for 5 people, but we cooked way too much and people took quite a bit home, even after having seconds - we could have served 8-10 people:

5 servings of soba or brown rice noodles, uncooked
3 cups vegetable broth
10 cups water
1 sheet roasted nori seaweed, broken into pieces, or in our case we soaked about a table spoon of wakame to start the broth.

1 cup thinly sliced shiitake mushrooms  

5 leaves of collard greens, cut out the stems, roll them up and slice them thin so you end up with thin collard greens strips, similar to the julienned veggies.

1 cup julienned carrot
1 cup julienned zucchini

1 cup broccoli florets
1 cup of daikon, cut katsuramuki style, first in sheets and then rolled up and sliced into thin strips, again, like the spiralized veggies. Alternatively, you could simply julienne them on the mandolin.

8 Tbsp miso paste
1 (14-ounce) package firm tofu, cut into 1-inch cubes
1/2 cup chopped green onions



Preparation:

  • Start the water, and add in the soaked wakame, or the nori, or both. (I have gone away from using hijiki because of its reputation for containing arsenic) this forms the foundation broth
  • Noodles: you can cook them separately, as the original recipe suggests, but I like to cook them with the soup for the last 5-7 minutes, for if they sit around too long cooked, they will stick together.
  • Prepare all your veggies, making sure you add-in the collard greens first, since they are the toughest. Keep the scallions (green onions) for last.
  • Add in the veggies, except for the scallions and let boil on a slow rolling boil for 5 mins, 
  • add in the 3 cup of veggie broth
  • Scoop out some broth and use to dissolve the miso
  • Add the miso, scallions, and tofu and let simmer for another 1 minute. Serve.
If you cooked the pasta separately, you add it in at the last moment, but I see nothing wrong with cooking the pasta in the soup for the last 5-7 minutes.

Oil-free hummus

1 15-Oz can of chickpeas, drained
1/4 cup of the aquafaba from the beans
2-3 garlic cloves, minced
zest of one lemon (thoroughly washed)
juice of one lemon
1 tsp of liquid aminos
if more liquid is needed, add some veggie stock or water.
optional 1 tsp paprika powder
optional some fresh parsley, or scallions

In the blender...

Stuffed Collard Greens and Collard Green Burritos

My idea here was that this is great food for picnics in the summer. You can make a stuffed collard green pocket or a burrito, and wrap it in a sheet of paper towel and wrap it in saran wrap and then use a sandwich bag. You can take that anywhere. I take it even to restaurants when I don't trust the food. "I'm on a diet." Eventually the restaurants will catch on. ;-)

I prepared the Collard green leaves two ways:
Steamed and then flatten the stems with a rolling pin - for the burritos
Fresh, but with the stems cut out and interleaving the two half-leaves, for the wraps.

For stuffings we had:
  • a pilaf of brown and black rice
  • quinoa with parsley and a splash of liquid aminos
  • hummus was pre-made at home with garlic and paprika powder and some parsley
  • steamed green beans
  • scallions, sliced thin
  • enoki mushrooms
  • Upton's Jackfruit Chili Lime Carnitas
  • Kimchi
  • sauteed onions, green peppers and white mushrooms
OK, you can see now we had too much for just five people. Some other time, I'd like to do this again with a bigger group, and have people assemble the burritos and stuffed leaves at the table, so everyone can pick their own favorites.

Preparation/Assembly

You lay out the leaves, add a smear of hummus in the center, lay on some quinoa or rice stuffing and then pile on your favorite mix of stuffings and roll it up.

It is easiest with the steamed leaves - burrito style. For the fresh leaves, you might need a toothpick to keep them together, or just hold them and eat them right away.

OK, all in all this was an orgy of fresh leafy greens, but with lots of color as well.

Besides the general lesson, one of our members, Sylvia, taught us all a lesson by taking the parsley stems home for her own veggie broth. If you have the time, it is worth cooking your own veggie broth. I do it once every few months, when I feel brave, and I fill some ice cube trays with my own veggie broth.

Starting #WFPB in April. Episode 11

Another easy day

Breakfast:

The usual, some fruit, some steel cut oats with more fruit and some kale and sweet potato. Lately I've been making it a bit spicier with some garlic.

Lunch: 

Cucumber salad, Pea soup, some multi grain toast, kale with sweet potato.


Dinner:

Neighbor came over.

Large salad of red leaf lettuce, with red onion, peppers, tomato, some salad olives, 1/2/3 dressing with the juice of one lemon and one lime and some scoops of quinoa. Some chia seeds and flaxseed.

Dinner was the last of the roast cauliflower from earlier in the week served over a bed of black and short grain brown rice pilaf, reheated in the oven on steam reheat. My neighbor loved it.

Presently, I am switching gears. I will have an irregular schedule for the next two weeks, so I'll be doing a bit more improv. This Saturday is my cooking class at St. Helena's - see my separate report - the good news for me is that I have a freezer full of nice soups to fall back on, and when in a hurry, a soup and salad will do just fine.